Book Review: God’s Servant Job

gods-servant-jobGod’s Servant Job: A Poem with a Promise, Douglas Bond, P & R Publishing, 2015.

The story of Job in the Christian Old Testament is one of the most poetic pieces of literature in the world. At the same time, it is one of the least read books in the Bible because of its difficulty to understand. Douglas Bond, in his book God’s Servant Job: A Poem with a Promise, crafts the well-known story into verse form.  Coupled with powerful illustrations from Todd Shaffer, the story of Job with all of its joy, anguish, and revelation, come to life in a new way.

Readers of all ages will appreciate this approach to the story. The use of rhyme is engaging and captures the essence of the plot. Job, a wealthy man, is tested by Satan, and his life is turned upside down. Satan’s bet is that Job will turn on God. Satan is proven wrong.

Job remains faithful to God.

There are times when Job complains or questions God’s actions (or lack thereof), but Bond adds commentary that this does not mean that Job is cursing God. This is important. Questioning God is not the same as cursing God. It is not the same as giving up on God or walking away from God. Too often, children and young people are taught that to question God is to sin.

That is not the case.

When we question, we seek the answers. Jesus famously said, “Seek and you will find.” The questions lead to growth.

This would be a great resource for children’s ministries or for a family. In the back of the book, is a collection of big words and definitions that readers encountered in reading the book. Along with the big words, there are questions about the story and how to relate to the Job.

You can buy a copy at Amazon or check it out at your local library.

Thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for a digital review copy.

 

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